Break 1 – Paris

Despite Paris’s unseasonably beautiful weather, I opted to spend the day inside, exciting my senses, at two of the city’s lesser-known museums:  The Grand Perfume Museum and the Fragonard Museum of Perfume.  As The Grand Perfume Museum explains, France is home to Grasse, the perfume capital of the world, and Paris, the global capital of chic, so there is no better place to explore society’s fascination with fragrance than in the country that captures it all.

 

The Grand Perfume Museum

Opened in December 2016, The Grand Perfume Museum showed signs of its first-year status; audioguides were unavailable for the visit and some exhibits were not yet completed.  Nonetheless, the videos, interactive games, and overall information presented by the museum entertained.  The self-guided tour can last as long or as short as one wishes, but with all of the intriguing displays, I ended up staying for a few hours, much longer than expected.

From history to science, the museum explained the origins of perfume, the biological processing of scents, and everything in between.

As one can imagine, smelling was a huge part of the experience.  Whether requiring a visitor to guess a scent or to match one to a memory, the exhibits engaged guests in creative and thoughtful ways.

Overall, the experience is well-done, with a wide range of expositions that spark multiple senses, appealing to children, adults, men, and women.  Once the museum addresses its minor operational difficulties, it can be added to the list of the many ways to pass a perfect afternoon in Paris.

 

The Fragonard Museum of Perfume

While the Grand Perfume Museum educates on fragrance as a whole, the Fragonard Museum of Perfume focuses on the Fragonard brand.  Another difference, the Fragonard museum offers free admission and a guided tour.  I did not make a reservation for an English guide, so I joined one of the French tours organized every 20 minutes.

I’m not sure if it was the information, the presenter, the French, or a combination of the three, but I felt that this tour was dull and drawn out.  Especially when compared to the Grand Perfume Museum, the Fragonard lacked engagement.  It is a passive experience, dominantly looking and listening, so visitors cannot connect to the content. When creating a museum about fragrance, the primary action should be smell!

The Fragonard Museum of Perfume is much more a museum than a full sensory experience, like that of The Grand Perfume Museum.  Paying to play at The Grand Perfume Museum is a more productive use of precious Parisian time than strolling through a staged tour at Fragonard.

 

Evenings at the Eiffel Tower

After spending hours indoors, I opted to watch the sunset from the Eiffel Tower.  With a stick of barbe à papa (translation: Dad’s beard), I sat on a bench in the Trocadero Gardens and enjoyed the magical hour between day and night in one of the most spectacular cities in the world.

 

Destination Locations

 

Paix, Amour, Paris,

A.J.H.

 

 

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Break 1 – Paris

 

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Language of Love

The next morning I found myself in a crowd of travelers from all over the world.  Though this isn’t a strange occurrence in Paris, it was a special one, because we were all appreciating Le mur des je t’aime, or the Wall of Love.  This mural, tucked away in a small park in the neighborhood of Montemarte, features written “I love you”s in more than 250 languages.  It took me a few minutes to locate the English inscription, as I was more interested in the findings of the other visitors.  While I could understand the Spanish “te amo” (upper right-hand corner) and the French “je t’aime” (left center), people were posing next to phrases so foreign to me that I could not even identify their region of origins.  There is still so much of the world to experience!

 

Passages of Paris

Breaking away from the gathering, I navigated towards the River Seine via a few of Paris’s passages, from Passage Verdeau, to Passage Jouffroy, eventually reaching the most well-known, Passage des Panoramas.  These “hidden” hallways house restaurants, boutique shops, and everything in between.  I enjoyed the afternoon in quirky antique stores and sophisticated photo galleries.

I followed the walkways down to my next location, “Les Deux Plateaux,” an art installation in the courtyard of the Royal Palace.  Though Daniel Buren’s work has been present here for more than 30 years, I had only recently discovered these funky fixtures.

Les Deux Plateaux de Buren | Alyssa's Abroad Perspective - alyssasabroadperspective.wordpress.com

Exiting the courtyard, I ended up just in front of La Comédie – a cafe that I had visited with my family on my last trip to Paris – and realized just how hungry I was!  Torn between wanting to try a new restaurant and returning to this reliable café, I ultimately decided to stay.  Compromising, I ordered a different meal, this time, the three-cheese quiche.  A self-proclaimed quiche connoisseur, I eat a lot of this dish.  My mom’s quiche is creamy, smooth, and moist, while my dad’s is dense and cheesy.  I enjoy both of my parents’ signature quiches, but La Comedies’ version was one of the best I’ve ever had.  Seriously, amazing.  Granted, I hadn’t yet eaten that day, and was (and still am) slightly appalled at the 14€-a-serving price tag, but this slice of heaven was worth it.

 

Shopping Soirée

An appropriate way to spend an evening in Paris, I went department store hopping, appreciating French fashion in the capital of all things chic.  The Galeries Lafayette (Haussman), as I’ve previously praised, is always worth a visit, at the very least for the free, panoramic views.  Expanding my retail tourism, however, I also explored Le Bon Marché, another popular Parisian shopping destination.  Though much less architecturally impressive than the Galeries Lafayette, this mini mall did have a funky, concept store section and a cool, vinyl record cafe.

Only have time for one?  Galeries Lafayette.  Not only is it’s location is more convenient, near the center of Paris, its glass dome and rooftop views rival the beauty of any other attraction in the city.

Eiffel Tower | Alyssa's Abroad Perspective - alyssasabroadperspective.wordpress.com

 

Travel Tips

  • Time of day matters.  When visiting the passages of Paris, consider when you choose to go.  If you arrive too early, or on a Sunday, many of the shops will be closed and the entire effect of the attraction will be missed.  You may skip crowds going at off-peak times, but I think that the skinny passages are in their full glory at mealtimes, when people are packed into cafés and window shopping, walking off the fantastic French fare.
  • Souvenir fail.  One of my favorite shops in the passages was Paris est une Photo. Though I appreciated his photography, I was more inspired by the old postcards mingling with the photos.  DO NOT BUY 12€ MOUNTED POST CARDS FROM THIS SHOP.  Five minutes down the hallway, I came across multiple shops selling vintage postcards for 1€ each, or less, and not just one or two shoeboxes full, but at least 10.  I’m usually a smart shopper, scanning all my options before going back to get the item I liked best, but of course I lost on this sole, spontaneous purchase.

 

Destination Locations

 

Paix, Amour, Paris,

A.J.H.

Family Week – April 20, 2016

Paris, Day 2, was even better than the first, combining typical tourist attractions with some special sights.

After passing countless closed cafés on our apparently early, 9 a.m. start, we came across Le Parvis.  Though it was just one of the many eateries on the Rue d’Arcole, it was the only one we found to be open.  Thankful that the restaurant was even going to serve us, we did not expect much from the meal, only craving morning nutrition.  Our breakfast, however, was delicious.  With outstanding omelettes, crispy croissants, and fresh juice, it was one of the best meals of the week.  Fueled with fantastic French food, we began our second day of exploration.

Of the many things I learned in my first years of French instruction, I have inexplicably distinct memories of discussing one of Paris’s grand shopping centers.  Based on my faint ideas and images of a beautiful building housing posh, Parisian products, my family and I set out to investigate my hazy remembrances.

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Combine the luxury of Saks Fifth Avenue with the mesmerizing appeal of stained glass to get the stunning Galeries Lafayette.  Cosmetics counters below and a glass dome above, the 9-story shopper’s paradise is worth a visit, if not for its fancy products or indoor aesthetic, then for its free, rooftop views.  With only a few sets of chairs but ample AstroTurf on which to sit, the terrace of the Galeries Lafayette was littered with lunchtime visitors soaking up the springtime sun and taking in the sights of the Eiffel Tower.  For my family and I, it served as the setting for our Parisian Macaron Matchup.

Macarons, often mistakenly identified as macaroons, have become associated with the French almost as strongly as the croissant has.  When I researched the best macaron shop in Paris, however, I found conflicting opinions. Fellow travelers narrowed the options down to two pastry houses: Pierre Hermé and Ladurée.  With a Pierre Hermé kiosk in the Galeries Lafayette, my mom, aunts, and I thought it a perfect time to try one of the best.

We ordered a cup of six, funky-flavored macarons to split, taste, and analyze.  The first flavor we tried, Imagine, of Matcha green tea and black sesame crisp, was all wrong.  Next was Infiniment Rose, which was much better, a very mild-tasting and pleasant treat.  Third, we tried Mogador, a milk chocolate and passion fruit macaron.  The tart wafers and rich center clashed, so we gave this one a thumbs down.  Fortunately, the citrus wafers and creamy center of Velouté Infiniment Orange tasted like harmonious creamsicle.  Following the orange macaron, we sampled Céleste, a passion fruit, rhubarb, and strawberry concoction, which wasn’t great.  We finished with Infiniment Menthe Fraîche, or mint, which was underwhelming too.  Overall, the sweets were made well, with soft-flavored wafers and tongue-shocking centers, but the flavors weren’t practical or enjoyable.

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After our snack, we set out to see the west side of the city.  On our way through the Place de la Concorde, we came across a Ferris wheel, which was erected to promote the 2016 UEFA European Championship, to be held in France this year.  A ride to the top offered sky-high views of the Avenue des Champs-Élysées and the Arc de Triomphe, our next destinations.

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Walking down the Champs-Élysées, I was surprised at the luxury, scale, and commercial presence on the street.  From what I had interpreted from my classes, this was a street of quaint, albeit inauthentic, cafés and small, overpriced boutiques, not stories-high chain shops.  Nonetheless, the tree-lined route made for a pleasant journey to view the towering Arc de Triomphe.

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Skipping the tourist cafés of the Champs-Élysées, my family and I searched for a snack around the Louvre Museum, the next stop on our Paris agenda.  Settling on La Comédie, I enjoyed my croque madame outdoors, people watching, like a true Parisian.

The grounds of the Louvre were dotted with visitors playing photography games, “pricking” their fingers on the top of the iconic pyramids.  This is where my family and I waited for our museum tour guide, Georgi, who my aunt discovered via Airbnb.  A friendly and knowledgable host, Georgi led us to the highlights of the Louvre, because the museum is impossibly large to tackle without a plan.

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We saw the Venus de Milo, the Winged Victory of Samothrace (my favorite), and of course, the Mona Lisa.  Georgi shared some of his art history expertise with us, explaining the story of the painting of the Mona Lisa.  Many years ago, an Italian man stole the Mona Lisa from the Louvre, creating a hype around the missing painting.  According to the story, once he was caught, investigators asked why he chose the Mona Lisa, and he replied that the work of Leonardo da Vinci deserved to be displayed in Italy, and because of its small size, the Mona Lisa was the easiest to steal.  With the excitement of the theft, visitors rushed to see the Mona Lisa upon its return to the Louvre.  The woman’s “mysterious smile” is a popular attribution to its acclaim, but Georgi pointed out that many of the other women in da Vinci’s numerous works portray a similar smirk.  He continued to explain that the Mona Lisa is, essentially, the Kardashian of paintings: beautiful in its own right, but famous for nothing.

Across the room from the little Mona Lisa hangs The Wedding at Cana, a grand painting by Paolo Veronese.  Georgi noted that the dimensions of this painting, about 22-by-32 feet, is generally the size of an average Parisian flat!  On our way out of the museum, we passed by another fun-fact art feature, the “selfie statue.”  Apollo Slaying the Python, the title of the work, clearly explains the act of the Greek god snapping a photo of himself to post on Instagram, #Louvre.

To end our spectacular second day in Paris, we made our way to the Trocadéro Gardens to see the Eiffel Tower illuminated in the Parisian night sky.  Though I was unable to enjoy the park itself, it provided a fantastic and full view of the Eiffel Tower.  Many others knew of the spot, with a street performer and local food trucks complementing the tourist crowds.  Fortunately, we arrived just in time to catch the sparkling lights of the grand tower.  Though there were hordes of people vying for the best angle of the monument, the location offered everyone an exceptional look at the eminent Eiffel Tower.

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Destination Locations

 

Paix, Amour, Paris

A.J.H.